Dit project is alleen beschikbaar in het Engels.

Revisiting Gender Training

Project

KIT designed and facilitated this project to critically reflect on the state of gender training in international development. The project brought together researchers and activists and practitioners through an online discussion forum, international conference and publication that updated the thinking on gender practice, and initiated further conferences in Nepal and Johannesburg.

Learning from 20 years in gender studies and training

A serious and critical review of what gender training represents and how it relates and contributes to the successes and failures of gender mainstreaming had not been undertaken globally since the late 1990s. KIT therefore initiated this process to provide a comprehensive look at ‘where we are at’  by facilitating discussion among gender experts and practitioners working in the field of international development.

The process began with a three-week online interrogative discussion moderated by KIT. At the end of this phase, key participants were selected to contribute their experiences and reflections to a publication, published by KIT. The final activity was a conference held at KIT in Amsterdam (14-16 May 2007) which provided some 50 practitioners, activists and academics with an opportunity to gather and reflect on almost 20 years of experience in gender studies and training. The aim was to critically analyse gender training and understand its role and its relations to other efforts to forward gender equality.

Project results

The project resulted in a reflection of gender training and gender knowledge captured in two publications: Revisiting Gender Training: the making and remaking of gender knowledge and a conference report.

The project also inspired two regional conferences: Gender and access to justice in sub-Saharan Africa (Johannesburg 2008) and South Asia Region Conference on Gender Knowledge Production and Dissemination in Development (Kathmandu 2009) as well as a edited collection on gender knowledge.