Publications

  • Lessons from an interactive research process: the case of Cowpea Farmer Field Schools

    Although agricultural research and development (R&D) in West Africa aim at improving the livelihoods of resource-poor farmers, the intended beneficiaries are often too poorly organised and consequently have limited political clout to influence the R&D agenda. The authors are not aware of farmers in West Africa funding agricultural R&D projects; this in contrast to farmers in Northern America and Europe

    Authors
    E. S. Nederlof, E. N. Odonkor
    Year of Publication
    2006
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  • Designing for development

    The medicinal plant sector in Uttaranchal, a Himalayan state in northern India, can provide an important source of income to the rural population, especially as returns from traditional crops are declining (Alam 2003). Because of its diverse agroclimatic conditions and relative isolation, India’s Himalayan region is richly endowed with a large variety of plant species, many of which have medicinal properties. The medicinal plants found in the Himalayan areas include species of particularly high medicinal value (Planning Commission 2000). People in India have long known of the benefits of medicinal and aromatic plants, which provide raw materials for both the pharmaceutical industry and traditional forms of medicine. Besides providing basic health care, the plants generate income and employment and also have implications for the preservation of biodiversity and of traditional knowledge

    Authors
    P. van de Kop, G. Alam
    Year of Publication
    2006
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  • Improving health worker performance: in search of promising practices

    Authors
    M. Dieleman, J.W. Harnmeijer
    Year of Publication
    2006
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  • Politics of the possible

    In 1995, Novib and a number of its partners initiated a courageous and risky journey; they undertook a collective learning and organisational change process to promote gender equality within their organisations. The programme was called the Gender Focus Programme. The Politics of the Possible is the story of the journey undertaken by seven NGO partners of Novib in South Asia and the Middle East. Today, a decade after the Beijing conference in 1995, it is hard to imagine that the process of gender mainstreaming and organisational change was uncharted territory when the GFP began. Thus the seven participating organisations, whose endeavours are the focus of this book, had to find their way using no more than an organisational development tool adapted for the programme.

    Authors
    M. Mukhopadhyay, G. Steehouwer, F. Wong
    Year of Publication
    2006
    Downloads
    Download 916_POP
  • Water and sanitation in the context of HIV/AIDS

    Authors
    M. Wegelin-Schuringa, E. Kamminga
    Year of Publication
    2006
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  • Bulletin 374 – Farmers’ organizations and agricultural innovation

    Since the 1990s Sub-Saharan African countries have embarked on major
    agricultural sector reforms, which led to changing and innovative roles for the public and private sectors as well as civil society organizations. Farmers’ organizations (FOs) now increasingly voice the needs of their members in various fora on policy-making and orienting service provision. They are solicited by the private sector to enhance chain development, including those for new markets, and they play a role in local development planning. FOs are now, more than ever, actively involved in agricultural development, which requires institutional, organizational and technological innovation in order to be successful. Providing user-oriented research, extension, and training services is therefore a prerequisite for technological innovation. Institutionalizing participatory methods, decentralizing services, creating multi-actor platforms and multi-stakeholder driven funding mechanisms all enhance demand-driven agricultural services. The private-sector and/or public-private arrangements currently play an increasing role in research and extension. FOs are thus evolving in an environment where stakeholders’ interests diverge and/or converge. However, the effective use of new technologies to become innovations is often defined by conditions other than simple access to knowledge and information; it often requires appropriate, innovative institutional and organizational settings. The agricultural innovation systems concept therefore considers links between actors, interactive learning processes, and the policy and institutional contexts that govern the system in order to better understand the generation, dissemination and application of knowledge. The agricultural innovation systems concept also emphasizes the need for all stakeholders to work together towards innovation for development

    Authors
    B. Wennink, W. Heemskerk
    Year of Publication
    2006
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    Download 913_Case-Study-Tanzania2
  • Tuberculosis recurrence and mortality after successful treatment: impact of drug resistance

    Authors
    Cox, H., Y. Kebede, S. Allamuratova, G. Ismailov, Z. Davletmuratova, G. Byrnes, C. Stone , S. Niemann, S. Rüsch-Gerdes, L. Blok, D. Doshetov
    Year of Publication
    2006
    Downloads
    Download 1175_Tuberculosis-recurrence_PLoS_Blok
  • Bulletin 372 – Origin-based products

    Worldwide, the choice of consumer products is increasing rapidly. One of the effects of economic liberalization is more international trade, so consumers are presented with new products and many more brands. How do they respond to this mushrooming number of products? If we can compare a modern supermarket with a dense tropical forest, how does a consumer find the right plant species that is safe and tasty? Do we need Neanderthal-like skills to fill our shopping carts with the right ingredients to feed our families?

    Authors
    P. van de Kop, D. Sautier, A. Gerz
    Year of Publication
    2006
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    Download 921_Bull372-web-zill
  • Measuring health-related stigma – A literature review

    Authors
    W.H. van Brakel
    Year of Publication
    2006
    Links
  • Estimating the resource needs of scaling-up HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis interventions in sub-Saharan Africa: A systematic review for national policy makers and planners

    Considerable effort has been made to estimate the global resource requirements of scaling-up HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis (TB) interventions. There are currently several medium- and long-term global estimates available. Comprehensive country specific estimates are now urgently needed to ensure the successful scaling-up of these services. This paper reviews evidence on the global resource requirements of scaling-up HIV/AIDS and TB interventions. The purpose of this review is to summarise and critically appraise the methods used in the global estimates and to identify remaining knowledge gaps, particularly those relevant to country level estimation.

    Authors
    A. Vassall, P. Compernolle
    Year of Publication
    2006
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  • Gender and health: policy and practice

    The growing strength of the women’s movement in the 1960s and 1970s challenged the ‘medicalization’ of women’s bodies and the medical construction of woman’s health needs as distinct from women’s own experiences and priorities (Boston Women’s Health Book Collective 1992). The women’s movement questioned the fallacy that males, as doctors or partners, knew better or more about women’s bodies than women did. Women articulated felt experiences of mental, physical, reproductive and sexual health needs. Analysing their experiences with reference to the social, political and economic forces that shaped health, women explored the connections between race, class and gender based oppression as they affected the health of women.

    Authors
    Anke van der Kwaak, M. Wegelin-Schuringa
    Year of Publication
    2006
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    Download 923_Gender-and-Health-nw
  • Impact of AIDS on rural livelihoods in Benue State, Nigeria

    Since the early 1990s, several studies have looked at the impact of HIV/AIDS and household responses, mainly in East and Southern African countries where HIV infection has reached rates in excess of 30% of adult populations (Kwaramba, 1998; Rugalema, 1999; Luzobe, Muheewa, Olaunah, Wandui, & Kalenzi, 2001; Shah, Osborne, Mbilizi & Vilili, 2002; Muwanga, 2002; Booyens & Arntz, 2003; SADC-FANR, 2003; Yamano and Jayne, 2004). These studies concluded that AIDS has a disproportionate impact on the morbidity and mortality of the most productive age groups. Its impact on households is characterised by a sharp reduction in the available time, labour and other resources of individuals and households, even leading to loss of assets. Because the disease has both a long incubation period and is accompanied by a lengthy period of illness, the socio-economic as well as
    psychological impact will be felt over a prolonged period. In addition to the suffering this causes, the increase in AIDS prevalence adversely affects individual lives as well as state development and efforts to alleviate poverty. In West Africa, the HIV/AIDS epidemic developed at a slower pace but infection rates are rising fast. Because countries have their own unique contexts, it cannot be assumed that the findings of East and Southern African studies on the impact of the epidemic can be extrapolated and used in a straightforward way to develop policy in other region

    Authors
    T. Hilhorst, M. J. van Liere, A.V. Ode, K. de Koning
    Year of Publication
    2006
    Links
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    Download 860_Impact-AIDS-Benue-State-formatted
  • The fight against stigma: an overview of stigma-reduction strategies and interventions

    Authors
    M. Heijnders, S. van der Meij
    Year of Publication
    2006
    Links
  • The match between motivation and performance management of health sector workers in Mali

    A motivated and qualified workforce is crucial to increase the productivity and quality of health services in order to contribute to achieving health services targets. Priority programmes have a stake in a skilled and motivated workforce, as they are implemented primarily by a health facility’s existing health staff. Motivation in the work context is defined as “an individual’s degree of willingness to exert and maintain an effort towards organisational goals”. The challenge for managers is how to create this kind of motivation. Research has shown that workers and their managers often perceive motivation differently. In addition, little is known about the motivational factors that are important for health workers in resource-poor settings.

    Authors
    M. Dieleman, J. Toonen, H. Toure, T. Martineau
    Year of Publication
    2006
    Links
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    Download 881_match-between-motivation-Mali
  • From access to adherence: the challenges of antiretroviral treatment

    The devastating impact of AIDS in the world – especially in sub‐Saharan Africa ‐ has led to an unprecedented global effort to ensure access to antiretroviral (ARV) medicines to treat the disease in every country where HIV is a threat. While the World Health Organization (WHO) goal of ensuring access to antiretroviral treatment (ART) for 3 million people by end‐2005 was not achieved, an estimated 1.3 million people who would not otherwise have been treated now have access to ART. This book is a
    testament to the early treatment successes and the hidden challenges of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in resource‐poor settings. It is also a wake‐up call to the risk of treatment failure and the development of widespread ARV resistance unless all patients are given the continuing support they need to achieve full adherence to ARVs. AIDS is particularly challenging because of the need to achieve very high (at least 95%) levels of adherence to prevent treatment failure and the generation of ARV‐resistant virus.

    Authors
    A. Hardon, S. Davey, T. Gerrits, C. Hodgkin, H. Irunde, J. Kgatlwana, J. Kinsman, A. Nakiyemba, R. Laing
    Year of Publication
    2006
    Downloads
    Download 932_MULTICOUNTRY-with-cover
  • The participation scale: measuring a key concept in public health

    Authors
    W.H. van Brakel, A.M. Anderson, R. K. Mutatkar, Z. Bakirtzief, P. G. Nicholls, M. S. Raju, R. Das-Pattanayak
    Year of Publication
    2006
    Links
  • The world of Artemisia in 44 questions

    Around 1.5 million people die every year of malaria; every 30 seconds a child dies due to this preventable and curable disease. Over 90 % of malaria cases and the great majority of malaria deaths occur in sub-Saharan Africa. Most of the affordable antimalaria drugs have become ineffective because Plasmodium falciparum – the malarial parasite responsible for the most severe malaria cases and deaths – has developed resistance to them.

    Authors
    W. Heemskerk, H.D.F.H. Schallig, Bart de Steenhuijsen Piters
    Year of Publication
    2006
    Downloads
    Download 879_The-world-of-Artemisia-in-44-questions
  • Developing a sustainable medicinal plant chain in India

    Authors
    Bart de Steenhuijsen Piters, P. van de Kop, G. Alam
    Year of Publication
    2006
    Links
  • Integration of sexuality into SRH and HIV/AIDS counselling interventions in developing countries: a systematic review

    Authors
    Anke van der Kwaak, A. Galati, R. Dickson, K. de Koning, A. Martin Hilber, R. Ploem
    Year of Publication
    2006
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    PDF version
  • Integrating sexual health interventions into reproductive health services: programme experience from developing countries

    Ten years after the International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD), it is relevant and necessary to review and reflect on progressmade in implementing a more holistic and comprehensive view of reproductive health care, as called for in the ICPD Programme of Action. In
    1994, the international health community agreed on the need to integrate sexual and reproductive health care services to meet the needs of women,
    men and adolescents throughout the life-cycle. Integration was seen to provide the best hope and means for quality, comprehensive and cost-effective service delivery. Since that time, however, efforts to integrate services have produced mixed results, and there is now a need to take stock of accomplishments and to suggest where further efforts are needed if countries are to provide quality, comprehensive sexual and reproductive
    health care.

    Authors
    K. de Koning, S. Hawkes, A. Martin Hilber, M. Waelkens, M. Colombini, H. Ormel, Anke van der Kwaak
    Year of Publication
    2006
    Downloads
    Download 880_Integrating-sexual-health