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Publications

  • ‘3 by 5’ – What are the implications?

    “There has never been such an overwhelming move to increase access to medicines in such a short period”. In one sentence, a conference speaker had given participants a view of the magnitude of the debate that conference organizers, KIT, Share-Net and Aids Fonds, ignited when they asked: “3 by 5: what are the implications?” The HIV/AIDS pandemic had been put in the right dramatic context without using dramatic effects. But by referring to the history of public health care, the speaker went beyond the limitations of the conference question, suggesting that traditional approaches will be far from sufficient to address the problem of HIV/AIDS.

    Year of Publication
    2004
    Links
    Downloads
    Download 645_sarahs_3by5
  • Towards pro-poor health planning in the context of macroeconomics and health

    Over the past years, poverty reduction has been explicitly driving the development agenda. In 1999, World Bank and the IMF agreed that nationally owned participatory poverty reduction strategies should provide the basis for all concessional lending and for debt relief under the enhanced Heavily Indebted Poor Countries (HIPC) Initiative. The Poverty Reducation Strategy Papers (PRSPs) put this approach into effect and describe a country’s macroeconomic, structural, and social policies and programs to promote economic growth and poverty

    Authors
    M. Paalman
    Year of Publication
    2004
    Downloads
    Download 711_Nepal-Case-Study-WHO
  • Economic impact of increased aid flows for HIV/AIDS in developing countries

    “For example, when I hear that countries are choosing to comply with medium-term expenditure ceilings at the expense of adequate funding of AIDS programs, it strikes me that someone isn’t looking hard enough for sound alternatives. And I recognize that such principles of fiscal discipline are in place for good reason, but surely there must be means of accommodating vast new inflows without stirring economic demons.“
    Peter Piot

    Authors
    P. Compernolle
    Year of Publication
    2004
    Downloads
    Download 712_Background-note-econ-impact-aid
  • Mainstreaming gender or ‘streaming’ gender away: feminists marooned in the development business

    This article is about taking stock of experiences of mainstreaming gender. It addresses two related concerns. First, that after three decades of feminist activism in the field of development – both at the level of theory and practice – most development institutions have still to be constantly reminded of the need for gender analysis in their work, policymakers have to be lobbied to “include” the “g” word and even our own colleagues need convincing that integrating a gender analysis makes a qualitative difference. Second, by constantly critiquing their own strategies, feminist advocates have changed their approaches, but institutional change continues to be elusive (except in a few corners).

  • How to investigate the use of medicines by consumers

    In developing countries, medicines may account for 30–40% of health expenditure. Many of these payments are made by individuals purchasing medicines for selfmedication and only rarely on prescription. Understanding how and why consumers make the choices they do is the critical fi rst step to intervening to ensure that these precious resources are spent as safely and productively as possible. This manual is a successor to the 1992 WHO publication, How to Investigate Drug Use in Communities, a small but important book that has been reprinted eight times. A year later came How to Investigate Drug Use in Health Facilities. Since then numerous courses have been held and many studies undertaken, with valuable experience gained in understanding the use of medicines in health facilities and communities. This manual’s authors have been leaders in the movement to better understand and improve medicines use in the community

    Authors
    A. Hardon, D. Fresle, C. Hodgkin
    Year of Publication
    2004
    Downloads
    Download 714_WHO-Consumers
  • Population survey to determine risk factors for Mycobacterium leprae transmission and infection

    Leprosy is an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae and is endemic in many developing countries. The World Health Organization (WHO) has adopted the goal of eliminating leprosy as a public health problem by the year 2005, defined as reducing the national prevalence below 1/10 000.1 Until now, the prevalence decreased mainly due to the introduction and subsequent shortening of multidrug treatment (MDT). Leprosy control strategies are designed to stop transmission through early case detection and treatment with MDT, but do not seem to have the desired effect. The number of new cases—719 330 in 20002—did not decline over the last 15 years, indicating that transmission is continuing at the same level.

    Authors
    M.I. Bakker, M. Hatta, A. Kwenang, William R. Faber (ed.), S.M. van Beers, P.R. Klatser, L. Oskam
    Year of Publication
    2004
    Downloads
    Download Population survey to determine risk factors for Mycobacterium leprae transmission and infection
  • An Approach to Understanding the Transmissionof Mycobacterium leprae Using Molecular and Immunological Methods: Results from the MILEP2 Study

    Important developments have taken place over the past decade in tackling the global leprosy burden. There has been a very significant reduction of over 90% in the total number of leprosy patients registered for treatment through the implementation of multidrug therapy regimes that have dramatically reduced the duration of treatment. However, despite this reduction in registered prevalence of leprosy, there has been no parallel reduction in the global case detection. This is a serious barrier to aspirations to eradicate leprosy in the future.

    Authors
    W.C.S. Smith, C.M. Smith, I.A. Cree, R.S. Jadhav, M. Macdonald, V.K. Edward, L. Oskam, S.M. van Beers, P.R. Klatser
    Year of Publication
    2004
    Downloads
  • Making public-private partnerships work for development

    For many years, official development assistance (ODA) to low and middle income countries seemed incompatible with private sector initiatives. ODA had its roots in charity while the private sector was looking for profits. ODA interests were on the side of recipients; the private sector’s interests were on the side of shareholders.

    Authors
    L. Leertouwer, J. Toonen, I. Segal, P. Leeuw
    Year of Publication
    2004
    Downloads
    Download 933_Report-on-Helffer-award-rev3 (1)
  • Bulletin 351 – Enjeux et viabilité des communes rurales au Burkina Faso

    Authors
    A.S. Bagré, H. Bary, A. Ouattara, M. Ouédraogo, D. B. Sanou, D. Thiéba, T. Hilhorst, G. Baltissen
    Year of Publication
    2003
    Links
    Downloads
    PDF version
  • Bulletin 350 – Cultivating a healthy enterprise

    Authors
    J. Belt, A. Lengkeek, J. van der Zant
    Year of Publication
    2003
    Links
    Downloads
    PDF version
  • Soutenir la mise en oeuvre de la décentralisation en milieu rurale au Mali

    Authors
    G. Baltissen, M. Heus, T. Hilhorst, A. Cissé, H. Diabaté, D. Ballo
    Year of Publication
    2003
    Downloads
    PDF version
  • Bulletin 354 – Building partnerships for sustainable development

    Authors
    H. Verhagen, N. Dorji, Biaou G., L. Abarca
    Year of Publication
    2003
    Links
    Downloads
    PDF version
  • Bulletin 353 – Reciprocity in sustainable development

    Authors
    J.J. Kessler, B. Romijn, R. Pistorius
    Year of Publication
    2003
    Links
    Downloads
    PDF version
  • The institutionalisation of gender equality in the Slovak Republic

    Authors
    M. Pigott, M. Appel
    Year of Publication
    2003
    Downloads
    PDF version
  • Managing research for agricultural development

    Authors
    N.M. Lema, L. Schouten, T. Schrader
    Year of Publication
    2003
    Downloads
    PDF version
  • Governing for equity

    The conference ‘Governing for Equity’ was the outcome of a process in which many individuals and institutions have been involved over a period of three years beginning in 1999. In that year KIT Gender, at the Royal Tropical Institute in Amsterdam, initiated a three-year programme entitled ‘Gender, Citizenship and Governance’.

    Authors
    M. Mukhopadhyay
    Year of Publication
    2003
    Downloads
    Download 472_Governing-for-Equity-Conference-Report
  • Bulletin 356 – Challenges for a viable decentralisation process in rural Burkina Faso

    A landlocked Sahelian country, Burkina Faso has an estimated population of
    around 12 million inhabitants and covers 274 000 km2. Its location presents considerable challenges for the economic development of the country. The climate can be classified as Sudanese, with two contrasting seasons, a rainy and a dry season lengthening into the more northern reaches of Burkina. Rainfall varies from one year to another and droughts can take a heavy toll on agricultural production, which is the mainstay of the Burkinabé economy.

    Authors
    A.S. Bagré, H. Bary, A. Ouattara, M. Ouédraogo, D. Thiéba, T. Hilhorst, G. Baltissen
    Year of Publication
    2003
    Links
    Downloads
    Download 601_sarahs_merge356
  • Identifying factors for job motivation of rural health workers in North Viet Nam

    Many Ministries of Health are trying to improve the functioning of their health care system by introducing changes in resource allocation, better management and changes in the role of the government, such as more responsibility at lower levels through decentralisation. A prerequisite of a well-functioning system is a well-motivated workforce. The Ministry of Health in Viet Nam gives great importance to the development of a public health network, in order to provide good quality health care services. As most people live in rural areas, an extensive public health network is required in rural areas so as to provide appropriate care close to the people. This implies the need to keep sufficient qualified and motivated human resources in the rural areas.

    Authors
    M. Dieleman, P. Viet Cuong, L. Vu Anh, T. Martineau
    Year of Publication
    2003
    Downloads
    Download 468_Identifying-factors
  • Life skills and HIV education in Africa: methods and evaluations

    Over the past several years the HIV/AIDS pandemic in Africa has been recognized as being more than simply a health issue. HIV/AIDS impacts every sector, including education. In the high HIV-prevalence countries of southern and eastern Africa, the education sector is currently being hit by massive teacher shortages due to death, absenteeism, and attrition as teachers fall ill, care for sick family members, or fill vacancies in other fields. At the same time, the needs of learners are changing as young people must learn at an earlier age how to protect themselves from HIV/AIDS and care for affected family members and friends.

    Authors
    G. Tiendrebeogo, S. Meijer, G. Engelberg
    Year of Publication
    2003
    Downloads
    Download 469_Life-skills-and-HIV-education-in-Africa
  • Creating citizens who demand just governance

    Mainstreaming a gender perspective in development was the overall strategy adopted at the Fourth UN Conference for Women, held in Beijing in 1995, to support the goal of gender equality. The rationale for this strategy is that it is important to bring the goal of gender equality to the centre of the development process. After three decades of gender and development activism, most in development institutions continue to need constant reminders of the need for gender analysis in their work. Why is it that policy makers still have to be lobbied to include the g word, and colleagues need to be convinced that integrating a gender analysis in their work makes a qualitative difference?