Publications

  • Resilience in Adversity

    The women’s movement in Zimbabwe has gone through highs and lows in its long history of mobilizing at different levels and on various issues. The first years of the 2000s were such ‘low’ ones that many afterwards wondered whether the women’s movement still existed. Yet new initiatives have emerged and grown, and contexts are changing. New generations and new modes of organizing and agency have taken shape, and significant successes in legal reform have taken place. This paper thus reframes the question about the status of the Zimbabwean’s women’s movement and explores how it is reconfiguring itself and continuing to exist. We first document recent methods of organizing and mobilizing by women in Zimbabwe and look both at new players and new forms of action. Secondly,
    we seek to document the movement’s achievements and challenges since the turn of the millennium. The focus will be on organizing through women’s NGOs. The women’s movement in Zimbabwe comprises many actors, key among them women’s NGOs and clubs; women in political parties and the labour movement; women’s religious associations and women’s professional or business associations. In this paper, however, the women’s movement refers to organizing through women’s NGOs. In documenting new players and new forms of action, as well as identifying challenges and achievements, the paper seeks to reflect on and rethink the women’s movement and its status in the contemporary Zimbabwean context. This also provides a basis for reflection on strategies for
    transformative change and their underlying theories of change, and on how women’s organizing engages with the state in the pursuit of gender equality and women’s rights.

    Authors
    Anouka van Eerdewijk, Teresa Mugadza
    Year of Publication
    2015
    Downloads
    Download 56fe453815bae_Eerdewijk-Mugadza-2015-Resilience-in-Adversity
  • Gender Matters in Farm Power

    This study explores how gender matters in small-scale farm power mechanization in African agriculture, particularly in maize-based systems. It investigates how intra-household gender dynamics affect women’s articulation of demand for and adoption of mechanization in Ethiopia and Kenya. The study offers a conceptual approach to grasp these gender dynamics, a gender analysis methodology, and a set of recommendations. The central research question is: How do intra-household gender dynamics affect women’s articulation of demand for and adoption of mechanization?

    Authors
    Anouka van Eerdewijk, K. Danielsen
    Year of Publication
    2015
    Downloads
    Download 56fe4a6ced6cd_Gender-Matters-in-Farm-Power
  • Speaking to men’s sense of responsibility

    Issue no.1

    Sexual and Reproductive Health (SRH) is a major focus area in South Sudan’s national health policy; the Reproductive Health Strategic Plan (2013-2016) has identified family planning as a key strategy for achieving the nation’s reproductive and public health goals. The strategy includes the launch of a national health and family life education campaign, initiatives to help couples make informed choices, and explicitly to encourage the involvement of men in the process.

    Year of Publication
    2015
    Downloads
    Download Speaking to men’s sense of responsibility
  • Ensuring financial access to quality care

    Issue no. 2

    Sexual and Reproductive Health (SRH) is a major focus area in South Sudan’s national health policy; the Reproductive Health Strategic Plan (2013-2016) has identified the improvement of access to and utilization of health facilities by all individuals as a key strategy for achieving the nation’s reproductive and public health goals. The strategy focuses on increasing access to and utilization of antenatal care, postnatal care and facility/skilled deliveries .

    Year of Publication
    2015
    Downloads
    Download Ensuring financial access to quality care
  • Costs and cost-effectiveness of community health workers: evidence from a literature review.

    This study sought to synthesize and critically review evidence on costs and cost-effectiveness of community health worker (CHW) programmes in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) to inform policy dialogue around their role in health systems.

    Authors
    M. Kok, K. Vaughan, S. Witter, M. Dieleman
    Year of Publication
    2015
    Links
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  • A qualitative assessment of health extension workers’ relationships with the community and health sector in Ethiopia: opportunities for enhancing maternal health performance

    Health extension workers (HEWs) in Ethiopia have a unique position, connecting communities to the health sector. This intermediary position requires strong interpersonal relationships with actors in both the community and health sector, in order to enhance HEW performance. This study aimed to understand how relationships between HEWs, the community and health sector were shaped, in order to inform policy on optimizing HEW performance in providing maternal health services.

    Authors
    M. Kok, K.Z. Aschenaki, D.G. Datiko, J.E.W Broerse, M. Dieleman, M. Taegtmeyer, O. Tulloch
    Year of Publication
    2015
    Links
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  • Supervision of community health workers in Mozambique: a qualitative study of factors influencing motivation and programme implementation

    Community health workers (CHWs) are increasingly recognized as an integral component of the health workforce needed to achieve public health goals in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Many factors intersect to influence CHW performance. A systematic review with a narrative analysis was conducted to identify contextual factors influencing performance of CHWs.

    Authors
    S.D Ndima, M. Sidat, C. Give, H. Ormel, M. Kok, M. Taegtmeyer
    Year of Publication
    2015
    Links
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  • News Letter for the Post-Ebola Resilience Programme – December 2015

    On the 14th of December 2015, several representatives of the Post-Ebola
    Resilience Consortium met informally at the KIT in the Netherlands. This two year programme was launched during the first Consortium meeting in July 2015 at the Njala University (Sierra Leone). This is the first consultation meeting since the launch of the programme and included the representatives of each of the three Work Packages (WPs).

    Year of Publication
    2015
    Downloads
    Download News-Letter-December-2015_final
  • Listening to the Silent Patient

    UGANDA’S JOURNEY TOWARDS INSTITUTIONALIZING INCLUSIVE PLANT HEALTH SERVICES

    Every year, farmers in sub-Saharan Africa suffer from unacceptable levels of crop loss as a result of plant health problems, threatening their food security, income and livelihoods

    Authors
    Remco Mur, Frances Williams, Solveig Danielsen, Geneviève Audet-Bélanger, Joseph Mulema
    Year of Publication
    2015
    Downloads
    Download Listening to the silent patient
  • Enhancing rural labour productivity

    Donors are increasingly interested in agricultural growth and economic development. The persistence of poverty in rural areas and the role of agriculture in climate change and food security, has renewed interest in smallholder and family farming for development solutions.

    Authors
    Joost Nelen, Bart de Steenhuijsen Piters , Helena Posthumus
    Year of Publication
    2015
    Downloads
    Download SNV-KIT_ruralpoor_WPS_3mm-web
  • Unleashing potential: gender and youth inclusive agri-food chains

    “Nine billion by 2050” is a commonly cited prediction on global population growth that frames arguments about access to natural resources, as well as the future supply of sufficient and nutritious food. Solutions for meeting food needs and for mitigating environmental constraints include: sustainable agricultural practices; innovative technologies to increase productivity and improve food chain efficiency; and, improved market access for farmers. But these solutions tend to be technologically biased, focusing on agricultural and value chain technologies – without enough attention given to gender and social disparities (Beuchelt & Badshue 2013; Pyburn 2014).

    Authors
    Rhiannon Pyburn , Geneviève Audet-Bélanger , Sabdiyo Dido , Gabriela Quiroga , Ingrid Flink
    Year of Publication
    2015
    Downloads
    Download SNV-KIT_WPS_7-2015
  • Bringing agriculture and nutrition together using a gender lens

    The feminization of agriculture is well recognized: women are acknowledged as the main food producers in mainstream development policy and practice. However, women are disproportionally affected by hunger and malnourishment. A growing body of literature focuses
    on how to contribute to improved nutrition through agricultural interventions. ‘Women’s empowerment’ is often cited as a promising strategy for improved nutrition.

    Authors
    Noortje Verhart , Annoek van den Wijngaart , Mona Dhamankar , Katrine Danielsen
    Year of Publication
    2015
    Downloads
    Download SNV-KIT_WPS_6-2015-web
  • Market-based solutions for input supply: making inputs accessible for smallholder farmers in Africa

    For agriculture to prosper, farm inputs need to be available, affordable, accessible, and good quality. Seeds, fertilizers, and agro-chemicals, are essential for improving the productivity and incomes of smallholder farmers in developing countries (World Bank, 2007, 2013; Rosegrant et al. ,2001; AGRA 2013; FAO, 2013). As input supply is a critical factor in inclusive agricultural and rural development, many donors support initiatives that improve smallholders’ access to inputs. Some of these programs are successful, others are not.

    Authors
    John Belt, Wouter Kleijn, Pauline Ancella Chibvuma, Elton Mudyazvivi, Morgen Gomo, Chola Mfula, Erastus Mkojera, Michael Opio, Isaahaku Zakaria and Kofi Boafo.
    Year of Publication
    2015
    Downloads
    Download SNV-KIT_WPS_5-2015-web
  • Extension in Motion

    Agricultural extension has a significant role to play in rural development. Yet, ‘extension’ itself is also developing and so is its role in development. How extension is understood, coordinated, financed and implemented has evolved over time. While agricultural extension used to be almost exclusively publicly funded and implemented in a top-down manner to increase productivity and transfer new technologies to small-scale farmers, since the late 1980s and 1990s the private sector has gradually become engaged in different ways and extension has evolved to being more participatory and holistic, at least in rhetoric.

    Authors
    Ellen Magnus , Verena Bitzer
    Year of Publication
    2015
    Downloads
    Download WPS_4-2015-web
  • Impact assessment and the quest for the Holy Grail

    Evaluation is seen as vital for both accountability and learning purposes. This involves understanding not only what worked but also the process of change and why and how an intervention worked. Donors, programme managers and evaluators often claim to seek not only successful outcomes, but the ‘holy grail’ of impact. This paper surveys the minefield of what impact is and how it can be reliably assessed, from the perspectives of proponents favouring (quasi)experimental, quantitative designs to those oriented towards the qualitative.

    Authors
    Roger Bymolt
    Year of Publication
    2015
    Downloads
    Download WPS3_2015_online
  • Planning the unplannable: designing value chain interventions for impact @ scale

    Value chain development approaches seldom deliver large scale impact. Based on the examination of five cases where impact at scale was realised, recommendations are offered to increase the chances of value chain interventions contributing to impact at scale.

    Authors
    Peter Gildemacher , Mirjam Schoonhoven , Anna Laven , Wouter Kleijn, Marije Boomsma, Ellen Mangnus, Kati Oudendijk , Jacqueline Sluijs
    Year of Publication
    2015
    Downloads
    Download Planning the unplannable: designing value chain interventions for impact @ scale
  • Towards the Burden of Human Leptospirosis: Duration of AcuteIllness and Occurrence of Post-Leptospirosis Symptoms of Patients in The Netherlands.

    Authors
    M.G.A. Goris, V. Kikken, M. Straetemans, S. Alba, M. Goeijenbier, E.C.M. Van Gorp, K.R. Boer, J.F.P. Wagenaar, R.A. Hartskeerl
    Year of Publication
    2014
    Links
  • Against the grain and to the roots

    Bringing a group of diverse but interdependent stakeholders together to build and stimulate the cassava and maize sectors both goes “against the grain” and “to the roots” of agricultural development in West and Central Africa. It requires new thinking and new organizational constellations, alongside an appreciation and inclusion of long-standing actors in these food crop systems. These actors include men and women farmers, primary processors, transporters, traders, researchers, extension workers, policymakers and input suppliers, to name just a few.

    Authors
    R. Pyburn, R Mur, G. Audet-Bélanger, S. Sanyang
    Year of Publication
    2014
    Downloads
    Download 53908428b5c28_Against-the-grain-and-to-the-roots
  • Child mortality patterns in rural Tanzania: an observational study on the impact of malaria control interventions.

    Authors
    S. Alba, R. Nathan, A. Schulze, H. Mshinda, C. Lengeler
    Year of Publication
    2014
    Links
  • Realising Gender Equality and Women’s Rights in a Neoliberal Era

    Year of Publication
    2014
    Downloads
    PDF version