Deze pagina is alleen beschikbaar in het Engels.

Publications

  • The doctor International Health and Tropical Medicine: time for another leap ahead

    For many decades, the Netherlands Society for Tropical Medicine and International Health (NVTG) has provided training in the Netherlands to doctors aspiring to work in low- and middle-income countries. Over the years, the training has professionalized, resulting in the formal recognition, in 2012, of the ‘doctor International Health and Tropical Medicine’ (doctor IHTM) as a medical specialization, by the Dutch Royal Medical Association (KNMG). In addition, the Commission for the Registration of Medical Specialists (RGS) recognized the Institute of International Health and Tropical Medicine (IGT), which oversees the implementation of the post-graduate specialization programme. This commission extended IGT’s accreditation up to 2021. However, the approval was not unconditional and stipulated modernization and an overhaul of the curriculum to better
    align it with the training programme.

    Authors
    B Gerretsen, et al.
    Year of Publication
    2016
    Downloads
    Download MT_Medical_Education
  • Gender relations and women’s reproductive health in South Sudan

    In South Sudan, women disproportionately bear the burden of morbidity and mortality related to sexual and reproductive health, with a maternal mortality ratio of 789 deaths per 100,000 live births

    Authors
    S. Kane, M. Dieleman, et al.
    Year of Publication
    2016
    Downloads
    Download GHA-9-33047
  • Risk Factors of Typhoid Infection in the Indonesian Archipelago

    Knowledge of risk factors and their relative importance in different settings is essential to develop effective health education material for the prevention of typhoid. In this study, we examine the effect of household level and individual behavioural risk factors on the risk of typhoid in three Indonesian islands (Sulawesi, Kalimantan and Papua) in the Eastern Indonesian archipelago encompassing rural, peri-urban and urban areas.

    Authors
    S. Alba, M.I. Bakker, et al.
    Year of Publication
    2016
    Links
    Downloads
  • Close-to-community providers of health care: increasing evidence of how to bridge community and health systems

    The recent thematic series on close-to-community providers published in this journal brings together 14 papers from a variety of contexts and that use a range of research methods. The series clearly illustrates the renewed emphasis and excitement about the potential of close-to-community (CTC) providers in realising universal health coverage and supporting the sustainable development goals. This editorial discusses key themes that have emerged from this rich and varied set of papers and reflect on the implications for evidence-based programming. We are at a critical stage in the development of CTC programming and policy which requires the creation and communication of new knowledge to ensure the safety, sustainability, quality and accessibility of services, and their links with both the broader health system and the communities that CTCs serve.

    Authors
    M Kok, et al.
    Year of Publication
    2016
    Links
    Downloads
  • Evaluation of the UNFPA Support to Family Planning Services (2008-2013)

    The evaluation provided an independent assessment of UNFPA interventions in the area of family planning and identified key lessons learned for the current and future strategies. The particular emphasis of this evaluation was on learning with a view to informing the implementation of the UNFPA family planning strategy Choices not chance 2012-2020, as well as other related interventions and programmes, such as the Global Programme to Enhance Reproductive Health Commodity Security (GPRHCS- 2013-2020). The results of the evaluation have informed the midterm review of the UNFPA 2014-2017 Strategic Plan.

    Authors
    H. Ormel
    Year of Publication
    2016
    Links
    Downloads
  • Routine or targeted HIV screening of Indonesian prisoners

    Routine HIV screening of prisoners is generally recommended, but rarely implemented in low-resource settings. Targeted screening can be used as an alternative. Both strategies may provide an opportunity to start HIV treatment but no formal comparisons have been done of these two strategies. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

    Authors
    P. Zwanikken, et al.
    Year of Publication
    2016
    Links
    Downloads
  • Assessment of the Dilli Annashri Yojna unconditional Cash Transfer in four Delhi slums.

    Background In India, the poor are increasingly forced to live in highly populated urban dwellings with inadequate living conditions including deficient service provision. This in turn affects their food security and negatively influences their health. In December 2012, Dilli Annashree Yojna (DAS), an unconditional cash transfer scheme was launched for the urban poor in Delhi to address food security and, ultimately, nutrition and health. Our study attempts to explore DAS for new elements like unconditionality and transfer to female head of family, use of benefits, operational issues and perceptions on its influence on health.

    Authors
    P. Zwanikken, et al.
    Year of Publication
    2016
    Downloads
    Download ASSESSMENT OF THE DILLI ANNASHRI YOJNA
  • Embedding systematic quality assessments in supportive supervision at primary healthcare level: application of an electronic Tool to Improve Quality of Healthcare in Tanzania

    Assessing quality of health services, for example through supportive supervision, is essential for strengthening healthcare delivery. Most systematic health facility assessment mechanisms, however, are not suitable for routine supervision. The objective of this study is to describe a quality assessment methodology using an electronic format that can be embedded in supervision activities and conducted by council health staff.

    Authors
    S. Alba, et al.
    Year of Publication
    2016
    Links
    Downloads
  • Evaluation of SNP-based genotyping to monitor tuberculosis control in a high MDR-TB setting

    The WHO has approved a post-2015 Global End Tuberculosis Strategy for tuberculosis (TB) 50 prevention, care and control. Countries need to respond by adapting and enhancing their TB control activities. Justifying investment in effective TB control strategies in a country can be achieved in part by defining and monitoring the (MDR) TB epidemic to identify appropriate interventions.

    Authors
    S. Alba, et al.
    Year of Publication
    2016
    Downloads
    Download evaluation-of-snp
  • Prevalence of River Epilepsy in the Orientale Province in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

    An association between onchocerciasis and epilepsy was suspected as early as the 1930’s in Mexico and later reports were published showing clustering of epilepsy in several African onchocerciasis foci. Ecological studies carried out in onchocerciasis endemic areas in West, Central and East Africa found a strong association between the prevalence of onchocerciasis and of epilepsy. In previous case-control studies this association was less clear, but this was probably due to shortcomings in study design and the selection of comparison groups. Moreover there seems to be an association between epilepsy and the degree of infection with Onchocerca volvulus. Indeed, in a study in Cameroon, performed before the introduction of annual ivermectin treatment (to control Onchocerciasis), the prevalence of epilepsy and the community microfilarial load were closely related. Moreover a case-control study demonstrated that the microfilarial loads (microfilariae per skin snip) in the epileptic group were significantly higher than in the control group.

    Authors
    E. Rood, et al.
    Year of Publication
    2016
    Downloads
    Download prevalence-of-river-epilepsy
  • Health systems research in fragile and conflict-affected states: a research agenda-setting exercise

    There is increasing interest amongst donors in investing in the health sectors of fragile and conflict-affected states, although there is limited research evidence and research funding to support this. Agreeing priority areas is therefore critical. This paper describes an 18-month process to develop a consultative research agenda and questions for health systems research, providing reflections on the process as well as its output.

    Authors
    E. Sondorp, et al.
    Year of Publication
    2016
    Links
    Downloads
  • Social norms and family planning decisions in South Sudan

    With a maternal mortality ratio of 789 per 100,000 live births, and a contraceptive prevalence rate of 4.7%, South Sudan has one of the worst reproductive health situations in the world. Understanding the social norms around sexuality and reproduction, across different ethnic groups, is key to developing and implementing locally appropriate public health responses.

    Authors
    S. Kane, M Kok, M. Dieleman, et al.
    Year of Publication
    2016
    Links
    Downloads
  • The long way to post-conflict health recovery

    Most armed conflicts over the past decades have been characterised by prolonged civil strife, disproportionally affecting the civil population. Displacement, affected livelihoods, deteriorated health status and economic decline are only some of the consequences. Morbidity and mortality may increase substantially, due to the direct effects of warfare, but often predominantly due to indirect effects as a result of deteriorating determinants of health, including malnutrition, increased epidemic risks, and declines in preventive and curative health services. The government, usually party to the conflict, is often not able or willing to protect its citizens.

    Authors
    E. Sondorp
    Year of Publication
    2016
    Downloads
    Download the-long-way-to-post-conflict-health-recovery
  • Does provider-initiated HIV testing and counselling lead to higher HIV testing rate and HIV case finding in Rwandan clinics?

    Sub-Saharan Africa has the greatest burden of HIV with 25 million people living with HIV by the end of 2012 . Knowledge of HIV status is imperative for prevention and timely start of HIV care [2–4]. About 30 % of people in sub-Saharan countries have never been tested for HIV. To achieve universal HIV testing, the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends provider initiated testing and counselling (PITC) to facilitate timely diagnosis and access to HIV related services.

    Authors
    M.I. Bakker, et al.
    Year of Publication
    2016
    Links
    Downloads
  • Discordant Treatment Responses to Combination Antiretroviral Therapy in Rwanda: A Prospective Cohort Study

    The aim of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) is to suppress plasma human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) viral load (VL) to undetectable levels. The usual median time to achieve full viral suppression is about 100 days. Most HIV patients, both in high-income and in resource-poor countries, also display an immunological response to treatment, measured as an increase in CD4 count. In 14–25% of patients CD4 count does not rise substantially
    despite successful viral suppression. This phenomenon has been referred to as an immunological discordant treatment response

    Authors
    M.I. Bakker, et al.
    Year of Publication
    2016
    Links
    Downloads
  • Population Based National Tuberculosis Prevalence Survey among Adults (>15 Years) in Pakistan, 2010–2011

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a global health problem. In 2014, an estimated 9.6 million people developed TB and 1.5 million died from the disease Currently, 22 high burden countries account for over 80% of world’s TB cases. Notification data in these countries often do not reflect the actual number of cases in the country due to incomplete coverage and absence of appropriate surveillance systems. Thus, direct measurement of the burden of disease through TB prevalence surveys remains key for understanding the spread and extent of the disease and aid in developing appropriate control measures in these settings

    Authors
    M. Straetemans, et al.
    Year of Publication
    2016
    Links
    Downloads
  • Factors influencing medical students’ motivation to practise in rural areas in low-income and middle-income countries: a systematic review.

    There is a shortage of doctors working in rural areas all over the world, especially in low-income and middle-income countries. The choice to practise medicine in a rural area is influenced by many factors. Motivation developed as a medical student is one key determinant of this choice. This study explores influences on medical students’ motivation to practise in rural areas of low-income and middle-income countries following graduation.

    Authors
    P. Zwanikken, et al.
    Year of Publication
    2016
    Links
    Downloads
  • Formative Evaluation of the EU‐Luxembourg‐WHO Universal Health Coverage Partnership (UHC‐P) 2011 ‐ 2016

    This report provides the result of an evaluation of the Universal Health Coverage Partnership (UHC‐P), a collaboration between the EU, Luxembourg and the WHO. As a formative evaluation, the focus is on lessons learnt, rather than on accountability. This review was carried out between March and September 2016 by KIT, the Royal Tropical Institute in Amsterdam, and mandated by WHO headquarters.

  • Towards inclusive Pluralistic Service Systems

    Rural agricultural advisory services to facilitate farmers’ access to information have made a remarkable comeback on the international development agenda. After years of neglect, much attention has recently been devoted to the emergence of pluralistic service systems (PSS), in which advisory services are provided by different actors and funded from different sources. Private companies, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and producer organizations (POs) today play more active roles alongside traditional public sector providers.

    Authors
    M Wongtschowski, Ingrid Flink, V. Bitzer
    Year of Publication
    2016
    Downloads
    Download 59146aa301c37_Bitzer-et-al-2016-Towards-inclusive-PSS
  • New directions for inclusive Pluralistic Service Systems

    A growing variety of public and private rural advisory services (Box 1) are available today, leading to increasingly “pluralistic service systems” (PSS), where advisory services are provided by different actors and funded from different sources (Wongtschowski et al., 2013). This is generally regarded as an important step forwards, away from reliance on monolithic, mostly state-led service systems.

    Authors
    M Wongtschowski, V. Bitzer, Ingrid Flink
    Year of Publication
    2016
    Downloads
    Download 59146c03f1a2b_Wongtschowski-et-al-2016-New-directions-for-inclusive-PSS-002