Publications

  • Unleashing potential: gender and youth inclusive agri-food chains

    “Nine billion by 2050” is a commonly cited prediction on global population growth that frames arguments about access to natural resources, as well as the future supply of sufficient and nutritious food. Solutions for meeting food needs and for mitigating environmental constraints include: sustainable agricultural practices; innovative technologies to increase productivity and improve food chain efficiency; and, improved market access for farmers. But these solutions tend to be technologically biased, focusing on agricultural and value chain technologies – without enough attention given to gender and social disparities (Beuchelt & Badshue 2013; Pyburn 2014).

    Authors
    Rhiannon Pyburn , Geneviève Audet-Bélanger , Sabdiyo Dido , Gabriela Quiroga , Ingrid Flink
    Year of Publication
    2015
    Downloads
    Download SNV-KIT_WPS_7-2015
  • Ariadne’s Thread

    Authors
    F. Zaal, R. Bymolt, M. Tyzsler
    Year of Publication
    2015
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  • Exploring competing experiences and expectations of the revitalized community health worker programme in Mozambique: an equity analysis

    Mozambique launched its revitalized community health programme in 2010 in response to inequitable coverage and quality of health services. The programme is focused on health promotion and disease prevention, with 20 % of community health workers’ (known in Mozambique as Agentes Polivalentes Elementares (APEs)) time spent on curative services and 80 % on activities promoting health and preventing illness. We set out to conduct a health system and equity analysis, exploring experiences and expectations of APEs, community members and healthcare workers supervising APEs.

    Authors
    H. Ormel
    Year of Publication
    2015
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  • Monitoring the response of cutaneous leishmaniasis patients to treatment with pentamidine isethionate by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and identification of Leishmania parasites not responding to therapy.

    Leishmania (Vianniaguyanensis is believed to be the principal cause of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) in Suriname. This disease is treated with pentamidine isethionate (PI), but treatment failure has increasingly been reported.

    Authors
    D. Mans, A.D. Kent, R.V.P.F. Hu, E.J. Lai A Fat, G.J. Schoone, E.R. Adams, E. Rood, S. Alba, H.J.C. De Vries, L.O.A. Sabajo, R.F.M. Lai A Fat, H.D.F.H. Schallig
    Year of Publication
    2015
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  • Supervision of community health workers in Mozambique: a qualitative study of factors influencing motivation and programme implementation

    Community health workers (CHWs) are increasingly recognized as an integral component of the health workforce needed to achieve public health goals in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Many factors intersect to influence CHW performance. A systematic review with a narrative analysis was conducted to identify contextual factors influencing performance of CHWs.

    Authors
    S.D Ndima, M. Sidat, C. Give, H. Ormel, M. Kok, M. Taegtmeyer
    Year of Publication
    2015
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  • Dynamics of Rural Innovation – a primer for emerging professionals

    Authors
    J Woodhill, R. Pyburn
    Year of Publication
    2015
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  • Bringing agriculture and nutrition together using a gender lens

    The feminization of agriculture is well recognized: women are acknowledged as the main food producers in mainstream development policy and practice. However, women are disproportionally affected by hunger and malnourishment. A growing body of literature focuses
    on how to contribute to improved nutrition through agricultural interventions. ‘Women’s empowerment’ is often cited as a promising strategy for improved nutrition.

    Authors
    Noortje Verhart , Annoek van den Wijngaart , Mona Dhamankar , Katrine Danielsen
    Year of Publication
    2015
    Downloads
    Download SNV-KIT_WPS_6-2015-web
  • Gender Mainstreaming Critiques: Sign Posts or Dead Ends

    Authors
    K. Milward, Maitrayee Mukhopadhyay, Franz Wong
    Year of Publication
    2015
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  • Which intervention design factors influence performance of community health workers in low- and middle-income countries? A systematic review

    Community health workers (CHWs) are increasingly recognized as an integral component of the health workforce needed to achieve public health goals in lowand middle-income countries (LMICs). Many factors influence CHW performance. A systematic review was conducted to identify intervention design related factors influencing performance of CHWs. We systematically searched six databases for quantitative and qualitative studies that included CHWs working in promotional, preventive or curative primary health services in LMICs. One hundred and forty studies met the inclusion criteria, were quality assessed and double read to extract data relevant to the design of CHW programmes. A preliminary framework containing factors influencing CHW performance and characteristics of CHW performance (such as motivation and competencies) guided the literature search and review.

    Authors
    M Kok, M. Dieleman, S. Kane, H. Ormel, et al.
    Year of Publication
    2015
    Downloads
    Download 56bdb58dae786_HPP-CHW-design-in-LMIC-review
  • Comparative Meta-Analysis of Tuberculosis Contact Investigation Interventions in Eleven High Burden Countries.

    Screening of household contacts of tuberculosis (TB) patients is a recommended strategy to improve early case detection. While it has been widely implemented in low prevalence countries, the most optimal protocols for contact investigation in high prevalence, low resource settings is yet to be determined. This study evaluated contact investigation interventions in eleven lower and middle income countries and reviewed the association between context or program-related factors and the yield of cases among contacts

    Authors
    L. Blok, S. Sahu, J. Creswell, R. Stevens, M.I. Bakker
    Year of Publication
    2015
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  • Market-based solutions for input supply: making inputs accessible for smallholder farmers in Africa

    For agriculture to prosper, farm inputs need to be available, affordable, accessible, and good quality. Seeds, fertilizers, and agro-chemicals, are essential for improving the productivity and incomes of smallholder farmers in developing countries (World Bank, 2007, 2013; Rosegrant et al. ,2001; AGRA 2013; FAO, 2013). As input supply is a critical factor in inclusive agricultural and rural development, many donors support initiatives that improve smallholders’ access to inputs. Some of these programs are successful, others are not.

    Authors
    John Belt, Wouter Kleijn, Pauline Ancella Chibvuma, Elton Mudyazvivi, Morgen Gomo, Chola Mfula, Erastus Mkojera, Michael Opio, Isaahaku Zakaria and Kofi Boafo.
    Year of Publication
    2015
    Downloads
    Download SNV-KIT_WPS_5-2015-web
  • Gendered Citizenship in the post colony

    Authors
    Maitrayee Mukhopadhyay
    Year of Publication
    2015
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  • Factors influencing the utilization of maternal health care services by nomads in Sudan

    Sudan has high maternal mortality. The rate among nomads – groups of people who move from place to place as a way of obtaining food, finding pasture or make a living – is very high and varies between different regions of the country. The objective of the study is to identify the factors affecting the utilization of maternal health care services by nomadic communities in Sudan, to make recommendations to improve their health. Nomadic health practices and health care services are the main influencing factors affecting the utilization of maternal health care services. Nomadic health practices are influenced by the mobile lifestyle of nomads, their low level of education and knowledge, gender norms, beliefs, values and attitudes, and their geographical locations. Existing health care services are ill-adapted to the nomadic lifestyle. The study also demonstrates some best practices from other countries that can be applied to the nomadic context in Sudan, such as community health workers, training and support for traditional birth attendants, provision of joint mobile health services for humans and livestock and the establishment of maternity or birth waiting homes. Since the utilization of maternal health care services by nomads is extremely low, the study recommends evidence-based strategies to increase community demand for services or bring women closer to emergency obstetric services.

  • Point-of-care management of urogenital Chlamydia trachomatis via Gram stained smear analysis in male high-risk patients. Diagnostic accuracy and cost effectiveness before and after changing the screening indication at the STI Clinic in Amsterdam.

    To measure the effect of changing the point-of-care (POC) testing algorithm of urogenital chlamydia for all male high-risk patients to those with only symptoms with respect to: diagnostic accuracy, loss to follow-up, correctly managed consultations and costs.

    Authors
    M. Bartelsman, M.S. Van Rooijen, S. Alba, K. Vaughan, W.R. Faber, M. Straetemans, H.J.C. De Vries
    Year of Publication
    2015
    Links
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  • Female Faculty and Leadership: Affirmative Action and Gender Equality in 13 Universities in Ethiopia

    The Educational Sector Development Programme (ESDP) IV has set objectives to strengthen the representation and leadership of women academics in universities. It aims to have by 2015 20% of academic staff to be women and 16 females in top academic positions (university (vice-) president). Affirmative action and women’s rights are also enshrined in the Ethiopian Constitution. Women have indeed entered the universities over the past decades; progress on gender balance in academic positions and university management is however below target. This assessment looks
    at the actual status in 13 universities, and identifies challenges of female faculty.

    Authors
    Anouka van Eerdewijk, Franz Wong, Fetenu Bekele, Lenesil Asfaw, Mahlet Mariem
    Year of Publication
    2015
    Downloads
    Download Female Faculty and Leadership: Affirmative Action and Gender Equality in 13 Universities in Ethiopia
  • Extension in Motion

    Agricultural extension has a significant role to play in rural development. Yet, ‘extension’ itself is also developing and so is its role in development. How extension is understood, coordinated, financed and implemented has evolved over time. While agricultural extension used to be almost exclusively publicly funded and implemented in a top-down manner to increase productivity and transfer new technologies to small-scale farmers, since the late 1980s and 1990s the private sector has gradually become engaged in different ways and extension has evolved to being more participatory and holistic, at least in rhetoric.

    Authors
    Ellen Magnus , Verena Bitzer
    Year of Publication
    2015
    Downloads
    Download WPS_4-2015-web
  • Moving to Mechanisation

    Authors
    R. Bymolt, F. Zaal
    Year of Publication
    2015
    Downloads
    PDF version
  • Social accountability for maternal health services in Muanda and Bolenge Health Zones, Democratic Republic of Congo: a situation analysis

    The Democratic Republic of the Congo is one of the countries in Sub-Saharan Africa with the highest maternal mortality ratio estimated at 846 deaths per 100,000 live births. Innovative strategies such as social accountability are needed to improve both health service delivery and utilization. Indeed, social accountability is a form of citizen engagement defined as the ‘extent and capability of citizens to hold politicians, policy makers and providers accountable and make them responsive to their needs.’ This study explores existing social accountability mechanisms through which women’s concerns are expressed and responded to by health providers in local settings.

    Authors
    M. Dieleman
    Year of Publication
    2015
    Links
    Downloads
    Download social-accountability-for-maternal-health
  • New policy-formulation methodology paves the way for sustainable laboratory systems in Europe.

    Laboratories are an essential and fundamental part of all health systems and their goal to improve health. Reliable and timely laboratory-investigation results are fundamental elements in decision-making in almost all aspects of health services and so directly affect the health and well-being of individuals and countries. Reliable and timely laboratory services are also crucial to a nation’s health security and economy and its ability to meet obligations such as the International Health Regulations. Approximately 60–70% of medical decisions are based on laboratory results. The ongoing outbreak of Ebola virus disease in west Africa has highlighted not only the crucial role of a strong health system in responding to public health emergencies but also the immense cost of ignoring this need. Within such a strong health system, effective high-quality (accredited) laboratories and response networks must be on the front line/

    Authors
    C.S. Brown, J. Zwetyenga, M. Berdieva, T. Volkova, R. Cojocaru, N. Costic, S. Ciobanu, S. Hasanova, S.M. van Beers, L. Oskam
    Year of Publication
    2015
    Downloads
    Download 55b613d0aed85_Brown-et-al-PHP-2015
  • Resilience in Adversity

    The women’s movement in Zimbabwe has gone through highs and lows in its long history of mobilizing at different levels and on various issues. The first years of the 2000s were such ‘low’ ones that many afterwards wondered whether the women’s movement still existed. Yet new initiatives have emerged and grown, and contexts are changing. New generations and new modes of organizing and agency have taken shape, and significant successes in legal reform have taken place. This paper thus reframes the question about the status of the Zimbabwean’s women’s movement and explores how it is reconfiguring itself and continuing to exist. We first document recent methods of organizing and mobilizing by women in Zimbabwe and look both at new players and new forms of action. Secondly,
    we seek to document the movement’s achievements and challenges since the turn of the millennium. The focus will be on organizing through women’s NGOs. The women’s movement in Zimbabwe comprises many actors, key among them women’s NGOs and clubs; women in political parties and the labour movement; women’s religious associations and women’s professional or business associations. In this paper, however, the women’s movement refers to organizing through women’s NGOs. In documenting new players and new forms of action, as well as identifying challenges and achievements, the paper seeks to reflect on and rethink the women’s movement and its status in the contemporary Zimbabwean context. This also provides a basis for reflection on strategies for
    transformative change and their underlying theories of change, and on how women’s organizing engages with the state in the pursuit of gender equality and women’s rights.

    Authors
    Anouka van Eerdewijk, Teresa Mugadza
    Year of Publication
    2015
    Downloads
    Download 56fe453815bae_Eerdewijk-Mugadza-2015-Resilience-in-Adversity